6 Must-Haves to Set the Stage for a Quick Sale

Is your home ready to welcome potential buyers? To create the best appeal (and fetch the best price), it is helpful to stage your home. Home staging refers to preparing your space to make it appealing to the highest number of buyers, with the goal of selling the home quickly and profitably.

While each house offers unique appeal, a few staging tips are helpful for nearly any home. To roll out the red carpet for your potential buyers, include the following must-have items.

Plants: Greenery makes a room feel warm and inviting. Use floor plants, tabletop plants or shelf plants to bring life to the corners of the room.

Candles: These provide a nice touch, but be sure to choose unscented or lightly scented. You don’t want to overwhelm visitors with an aroma or risk choosing a scent they don’t like.

Flowers: Add colour and cheer to your yard and your interior with in-season blooms.

Throw pillows: Adding these to your beds, chairs and/or couches can provide a nice finishing touch to your décor that makes the space more appealing.

Towels: Coordinated linens in the bathroom create a clean, crisp, and luxurious atmosphere. Make sure towels are hung neatly and are in good condition. A brand-new hand towel can provide a nice touch.

Artwork: Neutral artwork on the walls is preferable to family portraits. Remember, the goal is to make your space appealing to as many buyers as possible. This means depersonalizing so they can envision themselves in your space instead of you.

Top Design Trends for Today’s Homes

Wondering what’s hot and what’s not for interior design? Whether you’re hoping to create a buyer-friendly look as you prep your home for sale or simply want to stay on trend, these finishes will help you keep your surroundings looking sharp.

On the walls: Neutral is still in, but cold whites are fading away. Designers are reducing their use of these cold tones in favour of softer whites. These trending paint colours help make modern spaces feel warmer and more welcoming.

In the kitchen: Designers are moving away from all-white kitchens to add splashes of colour. Deep blues, greys, and greens are growing in popularity for kitchen cabinet choices. All the cabinets don’t have to be the same colour, either. One hue may be chosen for top cabinetry and accented with another shade for bottom cabinets. Contrasting metals in the hardware and fixtures complete the trend.

Off the presses: Recent enhancements to printing processes and modern materials have increased the quality of faux finishes. This emerging technology is allowing homeowners and designers to achieve the look of stone and other high-end finishes for flooring at a fraction of the cost and with easier installation. Choices such as marble and concrete will likely see a downturn as they are replaced by faux options.

From the outdoors: Homeowners are looking to connect with nature in their décor. Wood finishes are a top solution. Wood offers beauty and flexibility to apply to a variety of surroundings and suits a broad range of tastes. Designers can also incorporate this material to create a lighter and airier space, which is what many clients are seeking.

For the future: Builders and buyers are more environmentally aware than ever before. Current trends include eco-friendly materials and processes that reduce a home’s carbon footprint. Contractors and homeowners are striving to make sustainable choices that have a positive long-term impact on the environment.

What do you think about these trends? Have your design preferences changed over time? If you’re looking for any of these in a new home or thinking of making changes to your home, let me know how I can help.

Moving? Avoid These Major Mistakes

You might say that moving involves a lot of … moving parts. It can be difficult to coordinate all the aspects of pulling up stakes and putting down roots in a new place. Considering these challenges, it’s no surprise mistakes are made. From minor inconveniences to major disasters, moving blunders make the entire process even harder. Here are some of the most common missteps to avoid during your next move.

Making it a DIY project: Many moves can be handled by the homeowner, but not all. Be honest with yourself (and your friends). Do you really have the strength, time, and skill to pack, load, unload, and unpack all of your belongings? Consider any fragile or valuable items. Keep in mind any oversized belongings. Movers come with a cost, but so does trying to handle a project beyond your capabilities. Personal injury and property damage often end up costing more than movers would have.

Allotting the wrong amount of time: How long will it take you to pack? Many people under- or overestimate this time period. If you don’t give yourself enough time, you will be rushed and stressed when moving day arrives and you’re not ready. If you start too early, you may have to unpack and repack things that you need before moving day. A good rule of thumb is to count the number of bedrooms in your home, then add one. This is the number of days it should take you to pack. If you have a lot of items that will require careful wrapping and storage, add another day.

Skipping the purge: Moving is the ideal time to get rid of things you no longer need. As you pack, make three piles: trash, donate, and keep. This requires a little effort and organization, but the process will make your move more efficient and will save you time, money, and hassles in the long run.

Forgetting to call a real estate agent: When it’s time to move, a real estate agent is one of your most valuable resources. This professional can sell your current home, find your new dream home, and walk you through the entire process. Agents have been through all this before and can provide resources and advice as you transition from one home to another. Don’t miss their input!

Downsizing Prep: Common Heirloom Errors

The kids have all moved out. As you approach retirement, you know downsizing is in your future. It’s time to start considering what that will entail.

Realistically, you won’t have room in your new home for everything that has accumulated over the past two or three decades. Don’t make the same mistakes many downsizers do by holding on to items that should be purged.

Before it’s time to move, take stock of what is in your home. Have you kept anything for your kids that they really don’t want? Have an open conversation with your children to determine whether what you consider a precious family heirloom would simply be clutter in your child’s home.

Put the following items at the top of the list to discuss. These are three of the most common things parents keep that their kids would prefer never to inherit.

Books: Even if your children love to read, it’s likely they don’t want your old books (and they probably have their own growing collection they will have to purge some day).

If you suspect any of your books are valuable, do a search online or contact a book antiquarian. Otherwise, consider donating the books to a library or used book store.

Fine dinnerware: Has your child ever used a cup and saucer for morning coffee? Would he or she use silver flatware? For that matter, have you used any of these dishes in the past year?

Children and grandchildren typically don’t want to store multiple place settings of porcelain dishes. Go ahead and sell them to the consignment shop or to a company that offers replacement pieces for consumers seeking specific patterns.

Paper piles: Do you have shoeboxes of greeting cards, letters, and photos stashed under your bed? Piles of paper are overwhelming and nearly impossible for others to sort through.

Before downsizing, go through these papers and say goodbye. Read through cards once more; then recycle them. Scan photos to create digital files, or frame your favourites to pass along. Then get rid of the rest.

Moving? Make Yourself at Home Anywhere

Moving to a new home, a new city, or a new country can be exciting, but it can also be challenging. In the midst of unfamiliar surroundings, newcomers may find it difficult to get plugged in to the area. Fortunately, there are a few tried and true steps you can take to help yourself feel at home after a move. Try these tips.

Tap your hobbies. Look for local communities built around something you enjoy. Are you a runner? Seek out a running club. Do you love making crafts? There’s probably a local crafting group. From stamp collecting to scuba diving, your favourite hobby can help you connect with like-minded individuals and form connections in your new locale.

Use an app. If you know about a move in advance, you can use social media and other apps to find out about the people and places near your new home. Look for restaurants you might want to try, parks you’d like to visit, and unique shops you might enjoy. Get recommendations from locals. Armed with online research, you may feel like you already know your new home far before moving day arrives.

Find current connections. Are you a member of any organizations? Use alumni associations, professional affiliations, or service groups to help you connect. As with hobby groups, other members of these societies are potential sources of information, referrals, and friendship.

Say yes. One of the fastest ways to get plugged in to your new neighbourhood is to make a habit of saying yes. If you get invited to do something, don’t turn down the invitation. If you’ve never tried salsa dancing before, don’t say no because it’s outside your comfort zone. Be willing to try new things. Look for unique opportunities and seize them. You might be surprised at how many new enjoyable activities, people, and places you discover!

Ask your agent. As experts in their local markets, real estate agents are another great source of information. For the inside scoop on transportation, events, and other helpful tips, make use of this valuable resource.

Do You Need a Property Manager?

If you already own a rental property, or you’re looking to get into the business, the idea of having to deal with tenants and managing the property might be daunting.

But that’s where property managers step in.

A credible property manager will take over the responsibilities that rental owners might not want to handle. This could include surveying the market and area to determine a reasonable and competitive rate to charge for rent. Property managers can also help you sell a home by generating solid leads through a variety of channels, including social media, advertising, and the multiple listing service.

Once your property has caught the eye of prospective tenants, the property manager can help you vet the tenants to make sure any potential renters will be responsible and reliable. Once the tenants have been screened and approved and have moved in, property managers will even be able to protect you from potential lawsuits by staying up to date on your city’s laws, rules, and regulations to make sure you’re in the clear.

From there, they’ll be able to take over the less desirable parts of property management, like handling emergency repairs, creating monthly expenditure reports, taking care of important tax filings, and performing home visits. Given the wide range of services that property managers provide, you might now be wondering how much they charge. Fees vary widely depending on where you live, but most managers will charge one month’s rent to secure a tenant and then charge a monthly fee to manage the property.

As with all things related to buying and renting property, you’ll want to make sure you do your research before hiring a property manager. But once you find one that is experienced and dependable, you might be amazed by the peace of mind their services can bring.

Your real estate agent can assist by recommending a reputable company.

Five Interior Design Disasters to Avoid

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and that saying rings true for how one chooses to decorate one’s home. Therefore, one person’s love of leopard print could be another person’s decorating disaster. If you are looking to sell your home this year, change up or avoid these top five no-nos.

Wall-to-wall carpeting. Having wall-to-wall carpet is the number one no-no. According to Jonathan Scott of the famed Property Brothers, no one is looking to buy a house with carpet – which can hold many of life’s unsavoury side effects like dirt, stains, and hair.

Mirrored walls. In theory, this decorating idea should make a small space appear larger. However, according to Scott, the effect can actually make your room look like an “’80s dance hall.” Let the dance hall die and opt for full-length mirrors instead.

Clutter. When it comes to decorating to sell, less is almost always more. Be particularly picky about the foyer, since this provides the initial impression of the interior. Keep shoes, winterwear, bags, and other daily-use items organized and out of sight. Rearrange or remove furniture and décor throughout the home to make each room appear as spacious and inviting as possible.

Loud wallpaper. Although wallpaper can add that pop of colour that a room desperately needs, a loud or dizzying pattern can turn off buyers. If you want to add appealing hues, stick with paint.

White on white. Although beautiful, the colour white is not realistic when it comes to life’s many mishaps. Realtor.com recommends that homeowners gravitate toward rich shades such as rust browns, black, and forest green.

Could Driverless Cars Drive Real Estate Values?

Imagine a world where humans never have to worry about wasted commute times. Imagine being able to use that time to work, spend quality time with your kids, plan dinner, or catch up on some much-needed z’s.

Sounds magical, doesn’t it? That magic could be coming to a street near you, as driverless cars are poised to become mainstream technology worldwide.

As Tesla, GM, and BMW clamber to get their fleets on the streets, these autonomous cars could have a far-reaching effect on industries other than auto.

When the human is removed from behind the wheel, the potential for error diminishes. Therefore, safety precautions such as auto insurance, parking tickets, speed traps, and law enforcement may no longer be needed.

These vehicles could also have a significant impact on the real estate market. When autonomous cars become the new norm, public transit will no longer be the go-to for those who are unable to drive.

The loss of public transit could have a domino effect on the real estate industry, since cities would no longer be built around transit systems. What was once considered less desirable residential real estate may become more popularbecause of the distance from transit hubs. According to an article in Forbes, these areas could offer a “greater appeal [that] could translate into increasing demand and rising property values.”

The long-reaching impact these cars will have on society is still being mapped, but it should make for an interesting ride.

Increase Property Value by Avoiding These Landscape Blunders

Everyone knows the importance of making a good first impression. It’s no different when it comes to your home’s curb appeal, which refers to your property’s overall appearance from the street.

To make your home’s “frosting” as appealing as possible, you’ll definitely want to think about planting stunning blooms and making sure your landscaping is well manicured and maintained. Implementing a long-term landscaping plan can help increase your property value when it comes time to sell.

When you go to plant, make sure to avoid the below common landscaping mistakes that homeowners make when planting trees and shrubs.

First, avoid planting invasive tree species. Some such species, like bamboo, grow quickly and actually push out native plants, which does tremendous damage to an area’s biodiversity.

Another no-no is planting too much and too close together. When too many trees and plants are crammed together, the greenery doesn’t have enough space to grow bigger, stronger, or healthier. While aesthetically this could look good for the first few years, the plants will eventually mature and fight each other for light and nutrients. So, unless you want a property covered in dead leaves and branches, it’s best to save your coins and plant less.

When planting anything, you’ll want to make sure you’re not too close to home. This, professionals warn, is a nightmare in the making. Trees planted too close to the home will, over time, get woody and grow too close, which will bring bugs and moisture inside. The resulting dampness could actually lead to rot inside your house, and the tree’s big roots could damage your property’s foundation or basement.

When it comes to planting and maintaining your home’s green exterior, do your research and exercise restraint. While trees and shrubs certainly boost your home’s value and curb appeal, some green mistakes could cost you.

What You Need to Know before Becoming a Landlord

Thinking of becoming a landlord? While this can be financially and personally rewarding, you must do your homework before you take the leap.

To help you learn the ropes and avoid any costly missteps, here are some handy tips of the trade.

It cannot be overstated how important it is for landlords to do their pre-closing homework.

During the home inspection, remember to take a thorough look at the property to see what will need to be repaired or replaced.

For example, you might want to change the toilets to low-flow models. You’ll also probably want to invest in essential upgrades to three common areas: water, door locks, and flooring.

Don’t make the rookie mistake of underestimating the costs of fixing and maintaining the property, both before and after a tenant has moved in.

Most landlords account for insurance and taxes, but it’s easy to miss expenses like garbage, gardening, and regular maintenance.

According to Money, you should set aside at least 35 to 45% of your annual rental income to cover these costs. (And when you’re calculating this income, it’s a good rule of thumb to account for only 10 or 11 monthly payments per year.)

When it comes to finding a tenant, don’t be too relaxed. Interview prospective tenants on the phone first to find out if they meet your requirements. Then, it’s important to check your potential tenants’ credit and speak to their references. Confirm the source and amount of their income. It should be at least 2.5 times the annual rent. You should also learn what’s legal in your town. For example, can you ban pets?

Once you’ve found a great tenant, act fast to get the lease signed. From there, never forget that you’re running a business and your tenant is a customer. Treat your customer right, and success is more likely to come your way.

 

Learn the Language of Lighting to Enhance Your Living Space

A beautifully lit home is warm and welcoming. A distinctive glow can set the scene, enhance a room, highlight a detail, or make a workspace downright workable. But lighting has a language all its own.

Do you know the lingo? Flush, recessed, pendant, starbursts, pots … the list goes on. Where should you begin?

In a recent houselogic article, columnist Emily Dunham writes, “… lighting can be a bear to understand. The world has its own language (know what lumens and Kelvins are?), and increasing costs can make decisions intimidating.” Dunham notes that LED lights can cost as much as $35, and Apple sells a new number that goes for about $65.

But with careful planning, you can light up your life and go easy on the budget. Here’s a quick lighting language lesson to get started.

Kelvin is a scale of measurement for the “colour” a light produces.

Wattage tells you how much electricity a bulb consumes.

Lumens are the amount of light or brightness you get from a bulb.

The next important lesson is lighting layers. Since every room has different lighting requirements, it’s important to think in these three layers: ambient, task and accent.

Ambient is the general lighting in a room, often coming from overhead. Task lighting illuminates an area where a particular task is completed. Accent lighting highlights something to which you want to draw attention.

Think of the activities you do in each room and consider the options. For example, in the kitchen, you’ll want to avoid overhead lights that create shadows on the counters. Instead, choose side lights or under-the-cabinet lights to illuminate the tasks at hand.

The size of your room also dictates the lighting you need. It’s wise to use at least two types of lighting to create the ideal effect.

Now that you know the basics, go shed some light!

Want to Sell Your Home Faster? Try These Tips

When you’re getting ready to list your house, the goal isn’t just to sell – it’s to sell quickly! The longer your house is on the market, the less likely it is to fetch top dollar.

Want to sell your house as quickly as possible? These tips are essential.

Hire a real estate agent and follow their advice

Some sellers are tempted to go it alone. But for a quick sale that maximizes profit, go with a real estate agent – and listen to their suggestions. Their market knowledge is invaluable when it comes to pricing and marketing your home.

Boost your curb appeal

Give your front door a fresh coat of paint (punchy red, blue, or yellow is a nice way to switch it up), add hanging baskets and planters to your front stoop, and resod your lawn. A home that looks well cared for is more inviting to prospective buyers.

Stage it

If you really want to sell fast and you have the budget required, allow a professional stager to come and work their magic. Can’t swing the cost? Borrow some of their tricks: Get rid of all personal items, use mirrors to create the illusion of light and space, add throw pillows and blankets to seating, and put fresh flowers or small potted plants in each room.

Be flexible

Selling fast means maximizing the number of buyers coming to see your house, so be willing to vacate at a moment’s notice. Work with your agent to create as many viewing times as possible.

Are Renos Worth the Effort for Resale?

At some point during the chaos of every renovation, one question is asked: “Is it worth it?” Is it worth the upheaval? Is it worth the cost? Most important, is it worth the effort when it comes time to sell?

The answer: It depends.

It depends on what you choose to renovate. Are you planning major overhauls or minor improvements? Recent statistics suggest small changes may actually be better than extensive renovations when it comes time to sell.

The 2018 cost-vs.-value report from Remodeling Magazine shows that smaller upgrades vs. larger renovations get you the most bang for your buck.

According to the report, those who renovate on a massive scale should expect a return of 56 per cent. This is less than the steady return of 64 per cent over the past two years.

Why the drop? Craig Webb, editor of Remodeling Magazine, believes it is because some real estate professionals suspect their local market may be reaching its peak. He explains, “Consequently, spending a lot of money does not automatically mean your house will just ride the escalator up and be worth a lot more.”

So, if you are planning a reno in 2018, the rule of thumb is to keep it simple. Forgo a major kitchen overhaul for a simple upgrade that could recoup you 81.10 per cent vs. 53.50 per cent. Instead of building that addition to the master suite (ROI 48.3 per cent), consider something with more curb appeal, such as a new garage door (ROI 98.3 per cent), manufactured stone veneer (ROI 97.10 per cent) or a wood deck (ROI 83 per cent).

When asking yourself if all the effort is worth it, keep your real estate agent in mind.

This professional knows your market inside and out and can best advise you about whether your potential remodel will help sell your home quickly. Seek his or her input before starting your next project.

Closing Costs: It’s about More Than Your Down Payment

The first step in buying a home is deciding on a budget. How much house can you afford? Within what price range will you shop?

A down payment is, unfortunately, only one part of that budget. To correctly determine the affordability of a home, it’s essential that prospective buyers consider the costs that arise at the time of closing.

Closing costs vary from province to province and from municipality to municipality, and they can represent anywhere from 1 to 4 per cent of a home’s selling price, according to ratehub.ca. That may not sound like much, but when you’re looking to buy a $750,000 home, closing expenses can add as much as $30,000 to your costs.

Here’s a look at a handful of those expenses and what they will run you:

Property taxes. A property tax adjustment at closing ensures the sellers and buyers pay the amount of taxes each rightfully owes for the year. Depending on the date of closing, you may need to pay a lump sum on your new home or one you’re selling.

Legal fees. The preparation of the required legal documents by a lawyer can cost you at least $500.

Home inspection fee. Most home buyers like to include a successful home inspection as a condition of their offer to purchase. A qualified home inspector will cost $500 and up.

Land transfer tax. Each province charges land transfer tax (LTT), which is calculated as a percentage of the home’s purchase price. The rate of the LTT varies by province. Some cities also charge a municipal LTT, adding an additional cost to consider.

Are Renos Worth the Effort for Resale?

At some point during the chaos of every renovation, one question is asked: “Is it worth it?” Is it worth the upheaval? Is it worth the cost? Most important, is it worth the effort when it comes time to sell?

The answer: It depends.

It depends on what you choose to renovate. Are you planning major overhauls or minor improvements? Recent statistics suggest small changes may actually be better than extensive renovations when it comes time to sell.

The 2018 cost-vs.-value report from Remodeling Magazine shows that smaller upgrades vs. larger renovations get you the most bang for your buck.

According to the report, those who renovate on a massive scale should expect a return of 56 per cent. This is less than the steady return of 64 per cent over the past two years.

Why the drop? Craig Webb, editor of Remodeling Magazine, believes it is because some real estate professionals suspect their local market may be reaching its peak. He explains, “Consequently, spending a lot of money does not automatically mean your house will just ride the escalator up and be worth a lot more.”

So, if you are planning a reno in 2018, the rule of thumb is to keep it simple. Forgo a major kitchen overhaul for a simple upgrade that could recoup you 81.10 per cent vs. 53.50 per cent. Instead of building that addition to the master suite (ROI 48.3 per cent), consider something with more curb appeal, such as a new garage door (ROI 98.3 per cent), manufactured stone veneer (ROI 97.10 per cent) or a wood deck (ROI 83 per cent).

When asking yourself if all the effort is worth it, keep your real estate agent in mind.

This professional knows your market inside and out and can best advise you about whether your potential reno will achieve the return you desire.

Seek his or her input before starting your next project.

Closing Costs: It’s about More Than Your Down Payment

The first step in buying a home is deciding on a budget. How much house can you afford? Within what price range will you shop?

A down payment is, unfortunately, only one part of that budget. To correctly determine the affordability of a home, it’s essential that prospective buyers consider the costs that arise at the time of closing.

Closing costs vary from province to province and from municipality to municipality, and they can represent anywhere from 1 to 4 per cent of a home’s selling price, according to ratehub.ca. That may not sound like much, but when you’re looking to buy a $750,000 home, closing expenses can add as much as $30,000 to your costs.

Here’s a look at a handful of those expenses and what they will run you:

Property taxes. A property tax adjustment at closing ensures the sellers and buyers pay the amount of taxes each rightfully owes for the year. Depending on the date of closing, you may need to pay a lump sum on your new home or one you’re selling.

Legal fees. The preparation of the required legal documents by a lawyer can cost you at least $500.

Home inspection fee. Most home buyers like to include a successful home inspection as a condition of their offer to purchase. A qualified home inspector will cost $500 and up.

Land transfer tax. Each province charges land transfer tax (LTT), which is calculated as a percentage of the home’s purchase price. The rate of the LTT varies by province. Some cities also charge a municipal LTT, adding an additional cost to consider.

Condo Life Is Now a Reality for Many Canadians

With the dwindling of land available for construction of detached and semi-detached single-family homes, Canadians are accepting the need for vertical living and high-density communities. Even naysayers are contemplating life in a “box.”

The reality is – as Canada’s most recent census numbers indicates – condo living is here to stay.

The 2016 census revealed that 13.3% of all Canadian households (approximately 1.9 million households) live in condominiums – an increase of 1.2 percentage points over the previous census conducted in 2011.

Of course, that differs across the country and from urban areas to suburbs and rural locations. In Vancouver, for example, some 30% of the population call a condo home. In Toronto, that number sits at 20.9%. But in both Halifax and Moncton, the number of condo dwellers drops to below 5%.

Notes a recent CBC article published after census results were released: “In other cities, meanwhile, condos barely rate as a living option. In Greater Sudbury, Ont., Saint John and St. John’s … less than one out of every 20 people live in a condo.”

The numbers, of course, correlate to population: Both Vancouver and Toronto boast larger populations, and wildly different real estate markets, than their smaller counterparts. The census reported that, by homeowner estimates, the cost of an average home in Vancouver totalled $1,005,920 compared to $734,924 in Toronto. And across Canada, the average value of a home was $443,058, up from $345,182 in 2011. And, interestingly, two-thirds of households owned their condos, while renters accounted for the remainder. Perhaps something to watch for in future?

‘Curb Appeal’ Renos a Growing Trend

As the winter thaw begins, and spring buying and selling fever heats up, there are certain renovations you can make on your home to ensure you get an optimal return on investment (ROI).

Whether you’ve been waiting for that perfect time to list, or are looking to flip fast, being strategic with your home renovations can make the difference between losing money and having extra cash in your pocket.

As a Houzz article points out, when it comes to home renovations, the “size of your space, the scope of work involved, your DIY abilities, the quality of materials you choose and even your geographic location all play a part.”

Invest in curb appeal

However, your renovations don’t have to be earth-shattering. According to Remodeling magazine’s 2017 Cost vs. Value Report, the trend of making “curb appeal” renovations to your home scored a higher ROI than larger renovations.

Boost energy efficiency

Surprisingly, installing loose-fill fiberglass insulation in the attic came in as number one on the report. Although it doesn’t seem as exciting as other home remodels, it makes your home more energy efficient, and it can be accomplished yourself, inexpensively. Plus, it returns an estimated 107.1% on your investment.

Interestingly, something as subtle as replacing your garage door could yield you as much as an 85% ROI. Landscaping is another tried, tested and true improvement that can return as much as 650% to 900%, according to Global National, on your investment. Installing new windows, adding high-efficiency appliances and repainting the exterior and interior of your home can make a huge impact for little cost.

Key to success

Bryan Baeumler, host of a variety of reno shows on HGTV Canada, tells Global National the keys to a successful home reno is: Fitting your plan into a budget and not your budget into a plan; cost vs. impact; and what makes the most sense for you.

‘Is It Done Yet?’ How to Renovate With Kids

Spring home improvements can be stressful, especially when you’re living in the middle of it. Add children to the mix, and the tension increases.

But you don’t need to take a vacation while your home is being remodeled – even if walls are coming down. Here are some tips on how to continue to live as a family during a major renovation.

Your children’s space – and their routines – will be disrupted. To avoid comments like “When can we use the kitchen again?” share the construction schedule with them.

Prepare for disruptions: Kitchens and bathrooms are often the rooms being remodeled; unfortunately, they’re also the most used. If possible, consider completing one room at a time.

Set up a temporary kitchen in another room and prepare meals in advance that can be quickly reheated. Get the kids to help you devise a bathroom schedule; they may be more inclined to follow it if they’re involved.

Make safety a priority: Know where your kids are during work hours. Make sure they understand the safety risks, and put lots of space between them and the work. Also ensure your contractor stores tools away safely at the end of the day.

Dust can be hazardous for anyone with allergies. Plastic sheeting should be used to seal off the area under construction from your temporary living space, but you also may want to consider closing the heating and cooling vents. As well, your contractor should use nontoxic paints and stains.

Choose your contractor wisely. Make sure the company has a reputation for completing jobs safely, and be prepared to pay more for contractors who are properly insured and follow regulations. Ask them how comfortable they are with children on site and make sure everyone agrees to and obeys the safety rules.

Finally, when it’s finished, have fun together in the new space. After all, you – and the kids – deserve it.

Why Canadians Are Embracing the Trend of Smaller Homes

The small house movement may be coming to a neighbourhood near you, proving that “bigger is better” is not necessarily true.

Having a bigger space to fill, a bigger mortgage to pay, and a smaller disposable income make having a large home unrealistic for many young professionals and families.

In an article in homify.ca, the Canadian Home Builders’ Association suggests that Canadian homes have long been among the world’s largest, at 2,300 sq. feet (213.68 sq. meter) on average. And this hasn’t changed. In the same article, a 2017 report from consultant PwC suggests homes in Canada are the third largest in the world.

However, rising prices, dwindling space and an influx of immigration may make room for the small housing movement to gain a foothold in Canada. As the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) states: ” Home prices have risen ahead of economic fundamentals such as personal disposable income and population growth, resulting in overvaluation in many Canadian housing markets.”

In fact, cities such as Toronto and Vancouver have already witnessed the small housing phenomenon as limited space and affordability have forced developers to think small.

Paul Kealey, co-owner of EkoBuilt, near Ottawa, told The Ottawa Citizen that there are many positives to the small housing movement, as the houses are “cheaper to build and operate, less expensive to maintain and repair.” That also may mean lower taxes.

Sounds like the small housing movement is on the verge of packing a big punch in housing markets across Canada.